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FDA BPA assessment says bisphenol-a safe in food-contact products for infants, humans
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NEW EPA RODENT STUDY FINDS NO LOW-DOSE BPA EFFECTS ON REPRODUCTIVE FUNCTION OR BEHAVIOR

October 29, 2009

 

ARLINGTON, VA (October 29, 2009) —The American Chemistry Council (ACC) today commented on a significant study funded and conducted by EPA and published online yesterday in the journal Toxicological Sciences. In this study, researchers exposed female rodents to both BPA and ethinyl estradiol (EE2)in utero in a wide range of doses to look for effects.

Quotes below may be attributed to Steven G. Hentges, Ph.D., ACC’s Polycarbonate/BPA Global Group:

“This new rodent study, funded and conducted by EPA, finds that low-dose exposures of bisphenol A (BPA) showed no effects on the range of reproductive functions and behavioral activities measured. Well-conducted, peer-reviewed studies such as this provide the basis for reasoned government assessments and regulatory decisions.

“Eleven regulatory agencies from around the world have concluded that science supports the safety of BPA for people of all ages in its current uses. The results of this new study provide further strong support for those conclusions. Plastics made with BPA contribute to the safety and convenience of everyday life because of their durability, clarity and shatter-resistance. Can liners made with BPA are essential components to protecting the safety of packaged foods and preserving products from spoilage and contamination.

“These areas of scientific interest were identified as needing further research in a 2008 report on BPA from the National Toxicology Program. This EPA-funded, well-conducted study is a significant development in better understanding the safety of BPA. Sound scientific review must be the foundation of decisions concerning the government’s current and future regulatory process, as chemical management reform is considered.”

Background on the study

The study conclusion states: “The lack of effect of BPA on female and male rat offspring after oral exposure to low doses in our studies is consistent with the lack of adverse effects on growth, vaginal opening, fertility and fecundity of low doses of BPA in several other robust, well designed, properly analyzed multigenerational studies (Cagen, et al.,1999; Ema, et al., 2001; Tinwell, et al., 2002; Tyl, et al., 2002).”

The study titled “In Utero and Lactational Exposure to Bisphenol A, in contrast to Ethinyl Estradiol, Does not Alter Sexually Dimorphic Behavior, Puberty, Fertility and Anatomy of Female LE Rats,” (Bryce C. Ryan, et al.). In the study, researchers fed BPA to female rats during pregnancy and lactation at dosage levels approximately 40 to 4,000 times above estimated median human consumption, and the female offspring were studied for effects on behavior and reproductive function. No effects from exposure to BPA were found in this study. In contrast, the well-known estrogen ethinyl estradiol (EE2) had significant effects on the rodents, demonstrating the sensitivity of the study and the validity of the results for BPA.

   
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